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SCVMM 2012 R2 – Error 2912 NO_PARAM when using Hyper-V Replica

Virtual PC Guy - Vie, 03/01/2014 - 19:04

Another early issue that I hit when using System Center Virtual Machine Manager in my home deployment was that a number of operations would generate this error message:

It took a fair bit of investigation to figure out what was happening here – but the end result was that, in my case, there was a conflict happening between BITS and Hyper-V Replica.

I had configured Hyper-V Replica to use certificate based authentication over port 443.  SCVMM had also configured BITS to use certificate based authentication over port 443.  The result was that whenever SCVMM tried to use BITS to transfer a file – it would fail.

Fortunately – both BITS and Hyper-V Replica allow you to change the port that they use.  In my case I decided to change the port used by Hyper-V Replica from 443 to 444.  You can do this under the Hyper-V Settings:

Once I made this change – everything started working correctly.

Cheers,
Ben

Categorías: Virtualización

Linux Integration Services 3.5 Announcement

Virtualization Team Blog - Jue, 02/01/2014 - 21:41

We are pleased to announce the release of Linux Integration Services version (LIS) 3.5. As part of this release not only have we included several awesome features much desired by our customers but we have also expanded our distribution support to include Red Hat Enterprise Linux/CentOS 5.5 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux/CentOS 5.6. This release is another significant milestone in our ongoing commitment to provide great support for open source software on Microsoft virtualization platforms. The following paragraphs provide a brief overview of what is being delivered as part of this release.

Download Location

The LIS binaries are available as RPM installables in an ISO file which can be downloaded from the following link on technet:

http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=41554

As always, a ReadMe file has also been provided to provide information on installation procedure, feature set and known issues.

In the true spirit of open source development, we now also have a github repository hosted at the following link:

https://github.com/LIS/LIS3.5

All code has been released under the GNU Public License v2. We hope that many of you will use it for your custom development and extension.

Supported Linux Distributions and Windows Server Releases

LIS 3.5 supports the following guest operating systems:

  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 5.5-5.8, 6.0-6.3 x86 and x64
  • CentOS 5.5-5.8, 6.0-6.3 x86 and x64

All of the above distributions are supported on the following Windows Server releases:

  • Windows Server 2008 R2 Standard, Windows Server 2008 R2 Enterprise, and Windows Server 2008 R2 Datacenter
  • Microsoft Hyper-V Server 2008 R2
  • Windows 8 Pro
  • Windows 8.1 Pro
  • Windows Server 2012
  • Windows Server 2012 R2
  • Microsoft Hyper-V Server 2012
  • Microsoft Hyper-V Server 2012 R2

Feature Set

The LIS 3.5 release brings much coveted features such as dynamic memory and live virtual machine backup to older RHEL releases. The check marks in the table below indicate the features that have been implemented in LIS 3.5. For comparative purposes we also provide the feature set of LIS 3.4 so that our customers can decide if they need to upgrade the current version of their LIS drivers. More details on individual features can be found at http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dn531031.aspx .

Table Legend

- Feature available

 (blank) - Feature not available

Feature

Hyper-V Version

RHEL/CentOS 6.0-6.3

RHEL/CentOS 5.7-5.8

RHEL/CentOS 5.5-5.6

Availability

 

LIS 3.5

LIS 3.4

LIS 3.5

LIS 3.4

LIS 3.5

LIS 3.4

Core

2012 R2, 2012, 2008 R2

 

Networking

 

Jumbo frames

2012 R2, 2012, 2008 R2

 

VLAN tagging and trunking

2012 R2, 2012, 2008 R2

 

Live Migration

2012 R2, 2012, 2008 R2

 

Static IP Injection

2012 R2, 2012

Note 1

Note 1

Note 1

 

Note 1

 

Storage

 

VHDX resize

2012 R2

 

 

 

Virtual Fibre Channel

2012 R2

Note 2

 

Note 2

 

Note 2

 

Live virtual machine backup

2012 R2

Note 3, 4

 

Note 3, 4

 

Note 3, 4

 

TRIM support

2012 R2

 

 

 

 

 

 

Memory

 

Configuration of MMIO gap

2012 R2

 

Dynamic Memory – Hot Add

2012 R2, 2012, 2008 R2

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dynamic Memory – Ballooning

2012 R2, 2012

Note 5

 

Note 5

 

Note 5

 

Video

 

Hyper-V Specific  Video device

2012 R2, 2012, 2008 R2

 

 

 

Miscellaneous

 

Key-Value Pair

2012 R2, 2012, 2008 R2

 

 

 

Non-Maskable Interrupt

2012 R2

 

PAE Kernel Support

2012 R2, 2012, 2008 R2

 

 

 

Notes

  1. Static IP injection might not work if Network Manager has been configured for a given Hyper-V-specific network adapter on the virtual machine. To ensure smooth functioning of static IP injection, ensure that either Network Manager is turned off completely, or has been turned off for a specific network adapter through its Ifcfg-ethX file.
  2. When you use Virtual Fibre Channel devices, ensure that logical unit number 0 (LUN 0) has been populated. If LUN 0 has not been populated, a Linux virtual machine might not be able to mount Virtual Fibre Channel devices natively.
  3. If there are open file handles during a live virtual machine backup operation, the backed-up virtual hard disks (VHDs) might have to undergo a file system consistency check (fsck) when restored.
  4. Live backup operations can fail silently if the virtual machine has an attached iSCSI device or a physical disk that is directly attached to a virtual machine (“pass-through disk”).
  5. LIS 3.5 only provides Dynamic Memory ballooning support—it does not provide hot-add support. In such a scenario, the Dynamic Memory feature can be used by setting the Startup memory parameter to a value which is equal to the Maximum memory parameter. This results in all the requisite memory being allocated to the virtual machine at boot time—and then later, depending upon the memory requirements of the host, Hyper-V can freely reclaim any memory from the guest. Also, ensure that Startup Memory and Minimum Memory are not configured below distribution recommended values.

Customer Feedback

Customer can provide feedback through Linux Integration Services for Microsoft Hyper-V forum located at http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/windowsserver/en-us/home?forum=linuxintegrationservices

We are eager to listen to your experiences and any issues that you may face while using LIS 3.5. We hope that this release helps you maximize your investment in Hyper-V and Windows Server.

- Abhishek Gupta

Categorías: Virtualización

Faster Live Migration–Which Option Should You Choose?

Virtual PC Guy - Mar, 31/12/2013 - 18:12

Okay, now that I have talked about faster live migration with compression and faster live migration with RDMA – one of the first questions that comes to mind is: which option is right for you?

When we were developing Hyper-V in Windows Server 2012 R2 we did a lot of testing to try and come up with an answer to this question – and the answer is surprisingly simple.  All you need to know is: how much network bandwidth do you have available for live migration?

If it is 10gbit or less – use live migration with compression.

If it is greater than 10gbit – use live migration with RDMA.

It does not matter if you are using 1gbit, 10gbit or 40gbit network connectivity – this guidance still holds.  It actually does not matter if you have RDMA support or not.  If you have over 10gbit network connectivity available for live migration – live migration over RDMA will get better performance thanks to SMB multichannel support.

Cheers,
Ben

Categorías: Virtualización

Measuring Replication Health in a cluster

Virtualization Team Blog - Mar, 31/12/2013 - 07:51

As part of running a mini-scale run in my lab, I had to frequently monitor the replication health and also note down the replication statistics. The statistics is available by by right clicking on the VM (in the Hyper-V Manager or Failover Cluster Manager) and choosing the Replication submenu and clicking on the View Replication Health… option.

 

Clicking on the above option, displays the replication statistics which I am looking for.

Clicking on the ‘Reset Statistics’ clears the statistics collected so far and resets the start (“From time” field) time.

In a large deployment, it’s not practical to right click on each VM to get the health statistics.  Hyper-V PowerShell cmdlets help in simplifying the task. I had two requirements:

  • Requirement #1: Get a report of the average size of the log files which were being sent during the VMs replication interval
  • Requirement #2: Snap all the VMs replication statistics to the same start time (“From time”) field and reset the statistics

Measure-VMReplication provides the replication statistics for each of the replicating VMs. As I am only interested in the average replication size, the following cmdlet provides the required information.

Measure-VMReplication | select VMName,AvgReplSize

Like most of the other PowerShell cmdlets Measure-VMReplication takes the computer name as an input. To get the replication stats for all the VMs in the cluster, I would need to enumerate the nodes of the cluster and pipe the output to this cmdlet. The Get-ClusterNode is used to get the nodes of the cluster.

$ClusterName = "<Name of your cluster>"Get-ClusterNode -Cluster $ClusterName

We can pipe the output of each node of the cluster and the replication health of the VMs present on that node

Get-ClusterNode -Cluster $ClusterName | foreach-object {Measure-VMReplication -ComputerName $_ | Select VMName, AvgReplSize, PrimaryServerName, CurrentReplicaServerName | ft}

Requirement #1 is met, now let’s look at requirement #2. To snap all the replicating VMs statistics to a common start time, I used the Reset-VMReplicationStatistics which takes the VMName as an input. However if Reset-VMReplicationStatistics is used on a non-replicating VM, the cmdlet errors out with the following error message:

Reset-VMReplicationStatistics : 'Reset-VMReplicationStatistics' is not applicable on virtual machine 'IOMeterBase'.The name of the virtual machine is IOMeterBase and its ID is c1922e67-7a8b-4f36-a868-5174e7b6821a.At line:1 char:1+ Reset-VMReplicationStatistics -vmname IOMeterBase+ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ + CategoryInfo : InvalidOperation: (Microsoft.Hyper...l.VMReplication:VMReplication) [Reset-VMReplicationStatistics], VirtualizationOperationFailedException + FullyQualifiedErrorId : InvalidOperation,Microsoft.HyperV.PowerShell.Commands.ResetVMReplicationStatisticsCommand

It’s a touch messy and to address the issue, we would need to isolate the replicating VMs in a given server. This can be done by querying only for those VMs whose ReplicationMode is set (to either Primary or Replica). The output of Get-VM is shown below

PS C:\> get-vm | select vmname, ReplicationMode | fl VMName : Cluster22-TPCC3ReplicationMode : Primary VMName : IOMeterBaseReplicationMode : None

Cluster22-TPCC3 is a replicating VM (Primary VM) while replication has not been enabled on IOMeterBase VM. Putting things together, to get all the replicating VMs in the cluster use the Get-VM cmdlet and filter on ReplicationMode (Primary or Replica. You could also use the not-equal to operation get both primary and replica VMs)

Get-ClusterNode -Cluster $ClusterName | ForEach-Object {Get-VM -ComputerName $_ | Where-Object {$_.ReplicationMode -eq "Primary"}}

To reset the statistics, pipe the above cmdlet to Reset-VMReplicationStatistics

PS C:\> Get-ClusterNode -Cluster $ClusterName | ForEach-Object {Get-VM -ComputerName $_ | Where-Object {$_.ReplicationMode -eq "Primary"} | Reset-VMReplicationStatistics}

Wasn’t that a lot easier than right clicking on each VM in your cluster and clicking on the ‘Reset Statistics’ button? :)
Categorías: Virtualización

Faster Live Migration with RDMA in Windows Server 2012 R2

Virtual PC Guy - Lun, 30/12/2013 - 18:03

Today I want to go deep on faster live migration using RDMA.  In the past I have talked about faster live migration with compression – which is the default option for live migration in Windows Server 2012 R2 – but to me, faster live migration with RDMA is the more interesting topic to discuss.

The goal of faster live migration with RDMA is to take advantage of RDMA network acceleration in order to give you the fastest live migration possible.  We actually do this by taking advantage of SMB Direct – and actually perform the live migration over the top of SMB in this environment.

Not only does this give us access to RDMA network acceleration, but it also gives us access to other SMB benefits like native multi-channel support.  This all comes together to allow us to reach amazing speeds, with practically zero CPU overhead in the process.

Unlike live migration with compression, live migration with RDMA is not affected by the workload inside the virtual machine.  The primary thing that will affect the speed of your live migration is how many connection you have, and how fast those connections are.

So what do you need to do to get this working?  Well – simply put you need an environment that supports SMB Direct.  Thankfully Jose Barreto has already done a very detailed series of blogs on how to get SMB Direct working – so you can follow the directions here:

Once you have it all setup – you can utilize the new performance counters that we have under “Hyper-V VM Live Migration” to monitor live migration activity over SMB Direct:

Note – you can actually enable live migration over RDMA on a system that does not support RDMA.  In this case you will get live migration over SMB (not SMB direct).

Cheers,
Ben

Categorías: Virtualización

Weekend Scripter: Using PowerShell to Replace STSADM

The Official Microsoft IIS Site - Dom, 29/12/2013 - 09:01
Summary : Learn about a Windows PowerShell script to replace STSADM –o enumallwebs in SharePoint. Microsoft Scripting Guy, Ed Wilson, is here. Welcome back today guest blogger, Brian Jackett . Brian is a senior premier field engineer at Microsoft Read More......(read more)

PowerTip: Get Time Difference between Dates with PowerShell

The Official Microsoft IIS Site - Sáb, 28/12/2013 - 20:59
Summary : Use New-TimeSpan to produce the time difference between two dates. I know I can subtract dates, but is there a Windows PoweShell cmdlet to show me the time difference between dates? Use New-TimeSpan and supply the information! For example, to Read More......(read more)

Weekend Scripter: Use PowerShell to Host New Year’s Eve Countdown Clock

The Official Microsoft IIS Site - Sáb, 28/12/2013 - 09:01
Summary : Use [DATETIME] variables and arrays to produce a countdown timer. Honorary Scripting Guy, Sean Kearney, here filling in for our good friend, Ed. With the New Year coming up in a few days, I decided to present something silly and geeky. I want Read More......(read more)

Installing IIS on Windows Server 2012 with Web PI

The Official Microsoft IIS Site - Vie, 27/12/2013 - 22:04
Thanks to Microsoft’s Web Platform Installer (Web PI) installing IIS has never been so easy. Before using Web PI to install IIS became available, you had to use the Server Manager to install the Web Server (IIS) role and then select various Role Services that you need to be enabled. Depending on your level of expertise this could be a challenging task with lots scrolling back and forth and click upon click to get things just right, but now you can have IIS deployed with just 3 clicks of your mouse...(read more)

PowerTip: Use PowerShell to Create Hash Table

The Official Microsoft IIS Site - Vie, 27/12/2013 - 20:59
Summary : Use a Windows PowerShell cmdlet to create a hash table. How can I use Windows PowerShell to create a hash table if do not remember the special syntax? Use the ConvertFrom-StringData cmdlet, and put each key-value pair on its own line. (You can perform this on a single line by using backtick character plus n ( `n ) for a new line): PS C:\> convertfrom-stringdata "a=1`nb=2`nc=3" Name Value ---- ----- c 3 a 1 b 2...(read more)

PowerTip: Use PowerShell to Create Hash Table

The Official Microsoft IIS Site - Vie, 27/12/2013 - 20:59
Summary : Use a Windows PowerShell cmdlet to create a hash table. How can I use Windows PowerShell to create a hash table if do not remember the special syntax? Use the ConvertFrom-StringData cmdlet, and put each key-value pair on its own line. (You can Read More......(read more)

Phantom Elements in a Hash Table

The Official Microsoft IIS Site - Vie, 27/12/2013 - 09:01
Summary : Microsoft PFE and guest blogger, Chris Wu, talks about working with hash tables. Microsoft Scripting Guy, Ed Wilson, is here. Welcome back guest blogger, Chris Wu … Admittedly, hash tables didn’t catch my attention when I started Read More......(read more)

Phantom Elements in a Hash Table

The Official Microsoft IIS Site - Vie, 27/12/2013 - 09:01
Summary : Microsoft PFE and guest blogger, Chris Wu, talks about working with hash tables. Microsoft Scripting Guy, Ed Wilson, is here. Welcome back guest blogger, Chris Wu … Admittedly, hash tables didn’t catch my attention when I started using Windows PowerShell, but over time it has proven to be one of my favorites. This is largely thanks to its ability to assign names to values for fast lookup. Hash tables store key-value (or name-value) pairs, which means typically we use strings...(read more)

PowerTip: Display a Blinking Message by Using PowerShell

The Official Microsoft IIS Site - Jue, 26/12/2013 - 20:59
Summary : Use this one-line Windows PowerShell command to display a blinking message. Is there a one-line command that I could use to blink a message in the Windows PowerShell console to get the users attention? Pipe a range of numbers to the Foreach-Object cmdlet ( % is an alias), clear the screen in the Begin block, and then display the message, pause, clear the screen, and pause in the Process block: 1..3 | % -begin {cls} -process {"hello";sleep 1;cls;sleep 1}...(read more)

PowerTip: Display a Blinking Message by Using PowerShell

The Official Microsoft IIS Site - Jue, 26/12/2013 - 20:59
Summary : Use this one-line Windows PowerShell command to display a blinking message. Is there a one-line command that I could use to blink a message in the Windows PowerShell console to get the users attention? Pipe a range of numbers to the Foreach Read More......(read more)

PowerShell Report for a Windows Failover Cluster

The Official Microsoft IIS Site - Jue, 26/12/2013 - 09:01
Summary : Use Windows PowerShell to create a report for a Windows failover cluster. Microsoft Scripting Guy, Ed Wilson, is here. Welcome back guest blogger, Rhys Campbell … I’m involved in the administration of several Failover Clusters Read More......(read more)

PowerShell Report for a Windows Failover Cluster

The Official Microsoft IIS Site - Jue, 26/12/2013 - 09:01
Summary : Use Windows PowerShell to create a report for a Windows failover cluster. Microsoft Scripting Guy, Ed Wilson, is here. Welcome back guest blogger, Rhys Campbell … I’m involved in the administration of several Failover Clusters , and I wanted to be able to easily report on these and get an alert for any changes in status. Enter Windows PowerShell. This Windows PowerShell script uses various FailoverCluster cmdlets to write information about a Windows Failover Cluster to a HTML...(read more)

PowerTip: Add Computer to Security Group with PowerShell

The Official Microsoft IIS Site - Mié, 25/12/2013 - 20:59
Summary : Use Active Directory PoweShell cmdlets to add a computer to a security group. How can I use Windows PowerShell to add a computer to a security group? Use the Add-ADGroupMember cmdlet, and remember to use the SAM account name on the computer: To add a computer called “STATION01” to a security group called “RDPEnabled”: ADD-ADGroupMember “RDPEnabled” –members “STATION01$” Note The SAM account name has a “ $ ” added to its name...(read more)

PowerTip: Add Computer to Security Group with PowerShell

The Official Microsoft IIS Site - Mié, 25/12/2013 - 20:59
Summary : Use Active Directory PoweShell cmdlets to add a computer to a security group. How can I use Windows PowerShell to add a computer to a security group? Use the Add-ADGroupMember cmdlet, and remember to use the SAM account name on the computer Read More......(read more)

‘Twas the Night Before Scripting: Part 5

The Official Microsoft IIS Site - Mié, 25/12/2013 - 09:01
Summary : Tonight, our Admin friend learns to migrate group memberships. Microsoft Scripting Guy, Ed Wilson, here. If you missed it, be sure to watch Sean’s video: Just Script It! Also to catch up with our story, read: ‘Twas the Night of Before Read More......(read more)
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